Announcement: Open Review for “Finding Balance: Collaborative Workflows for Risk Management in Sharing Cultural Heritage Collections Online” (book)

Editors note: text below by the primary authors; shared here to support the authors’ open review. -Josh, Will, Maria

Carrie Hintz, Melanie T. Kowalski, Sarah Quigley, and Jody Bailey, the authors of Finding Balance: Collaborative Workflows for Risk Management in Sharing Cultural Heritage Collections Online, are seeking critical, constructive feedback and comments on this preprint draft of their book to ensure accuracy and clarity. To that end, we are sharing the book for open review. More information about the book and our plan for the review process is below.

Overview of Book

In the fall of 2021, we submitted a proposal for this project to the Scholarly Communication Notebook (SCN) initiative led by Will Cross at North Carolina State University Libraries, Josh Bolick at University of Kansas Libraries, and Maria Bonn at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign School of Information Sciences and supported by IMLS grants LG-72-17-0132-17 and LG-36-19-0021-19. We are grateful that our project was selected for inclusion in the SCN. It was conceived as an open educational resource (OER) focused on managing and creating workflows around copyright risk and digitizing and sharing cultural heritage collections online. We hope it will prove useful to library and information science students who are interested in working as scholarly communications specialists or archivists after they finish their studies. We also hope that library and archives professional practitioners will find this book to be a rich resource for continuing education. It is important to note that although much of this book focuses on copyright, we did not create it for legal scholars or attorneys. It is intended to be a practical guide to help cultural heritage professionals who are not experts in copyright law. Licensed with a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC-BY-NC 4.0) license, the book will be published more formally in 2023.

How will open review work?

The book is currently in Google Docs, and anyone can follow this link and add comments for approximately 8 weeks, at which point comments will be closed and considered by us as we move toward more formal publication. Anonymous review is permitted, and we ask all reviewers to provide comments only, not edits to the text itself. Reviewers who wish to have their review acknowledged should sign their review with their preferred spelling of their name. Critical, constructive feedback is welcome and appreciated; abusive or combative comments will be deleted and/or ignored. Be the reviewer you wish you had, and help make this work the best it can be. Thank you in advance for taking the time to review the book, and please contact us if you have any questions at FindingBalanceOER@gmail.com.

New to the SCN: Open Pedagogy in Practice: A Primer for Librarians

This is the latest post in a series announcing resources created for the Scholarly Communication Notebook, or SCN. The SCN is a hub of open teaching and learning content on scholcomm topics that is both a complement to an open book-level introduction to scholarly communication librarianship and a disciplinary and course community for inclusively sharing models and practices. IMLS funded the SCN in 2019, permitting us to pay creators for their labor while building a solid initial collection. These works are the result of one of three calls for proposals (our first CFP was issued in fall 2020; the second in late spring ‘21, and the third in late fall 2021).

Today we’re excited to share “Open Pedagogy in Practice: A Primer for Librarians” (available via Pressbooks and in the SCN OER Commons Hub). This work was created by Lindsey Gumb and Mandi Goodsett to help librarians and LIS students understand perspectives from teaching faculty (via podcast interviews with them) and proposing an adaptable lesson plan for implementing open pedagogy in library instruction. Here they are to introduce Open Pedagogy in Practice:

As faculty interest and knowledge of open educational resources have increased over the last several years, so has their interest in involving students in the creation and revision processes of these free resources. As librarians and faculty navigate this new and exciting path together, all parties should be mindful of examining the needs of our students as they begin their own exciting journeys as open scholars.

In this support primer, you’ll find a collection of podcast interviews, as well as one-shot lesson plans for librarians or faculty who are exploring open pedagogy in the classroom. Mandi’s podcast series of faculty interviews will be helpful for other faculty seeking to learn more about their peers’ experiences with open pedagogy, but librarians will also benefit from hearing first hand perspectives so they can better understand the necessary support librarians might provide. The one-shot lesson plans are intended to assist academic librarians tasked with supporting faculty embarking on open pedagogy projects; however, we recognize that it often takes a village, and individuals in other roles will also benefit from these (adaptable) lesson plans.

We hope that the community will not only learn from this support primer but that it will expand upon it and transform it into something even better than we could have ever imagined! We’d love to hear from you if you have feedback or suggestions for us; contact us at a.goodsett[at]csuohio.edu or lgumb[at]rwu.edu.

About the Authors

Mandi Goodsett (she/her) is the Performing Arts & Humanities Librarian, as well as the Open Educational Resource & Copyright Advisor, at Cleveland State University. She serves as an OhioLINK Affordable Learning Ambassador and an instructor for the Open Education Network OER Librarianship Certification. Her research interests include open education, critical thinking in library instruction, mentoring new professionals, and sustainability in libraries. In her free time Mandi loves cooking, playing board games with friends, and enjoying the outdoors of Northeast Ohio.

Lindsey Gumb is an Associate Professor and Scholarly Communications Librarian at Roger Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island, and she also serves as the Open Education Fellow at the New England Board of Higher Education in Boston, Massachusetts. With an active interest in the intersections of information literacy, open education, and critical librarianship, Lindsey works with faculty on her campus and region-wide to push the awareness of open education from a cost-savings tool to be more inclusive of pedagogies that allow for opportunities to create systemic changes in more representative and equitable information creation, evaluation, and access. She resides in Rhode Island with her family and together they enjoy the beach, hiking, gardening, and their animals.

New to the SCN: Teaching with Copyright Chat

This is the latest post in a series announcing resources created for the Scholarly Communication Notebook, or SCN. The SCN is a hub of open teaching and learning content on scholcomm topics that is both a complement to an open book-level introduction to scholarly communication librarianship and a disciplinary and course community for inclusively sharing models and practices. IMLS funded the SCN in 2019, permitting us to pay creators for their labor while building a solid initial collection. These works are the result of one of three calls for proposals (our first CFP was issued in fall 2020; the second in late spring ‘21, and the third in late fall 2021).

Today we’re excited to share “Lessons from Practice: Teaching with Copyright Chat” (available in the SCN OER Commons Hub as well as its own project site), contributed by Sara Benson, who is also curating the SCN Copyright Collection. Sara has been hosting the Copyright Chat podcast since 2017, in which she interviews experts about issues in copyright. These recordings are rich with pedagogic potential, which Sara has developed for us. Here she is to introduce Teaching with Copyright Chat:

I started the podcast titled Copyright Chat to engage with the broader public (outside of my home institution in Illinois) including librarians, students and professors of information science, and the general public about copyright issues relevant to libraries. I work at a land grant institution and part of our mission is to bring our educational efforts to the rest of the state, the country, and, ultimately, the world. In my daily work as a Copyright Librarian, I quickly became aware that copyright is an area of the law that is not well understood–mostly because it is not discussed with enough frequency to become common knowledge with members of the campus community. The most exciting part of hosting Copyright Chat is that I get to learn new things about copyright law by talking to different copyright experts and professionals, too. Copyright law is an exciting area of the law because it changes often through new case-law and legislative and administrative developments–so the podcast is an ever-evolving project.

The podcast archives some evergreen topics such as discussions about author’s rights, copyright myths, and fair use. Although copyright law never gets dull because new cases and laws continue to arise, there are some topics that are key to being a successful information professional. For that reason, select episodes of the podcast were chosen to provide educational context for students studying information science to learn about copyright issues.

Screen capture of Teaching with Copyright Chat Podcast, featuring the logo and header image of the site, basic navigation, and title: Lessons from Practice: Teaching with Copyright Chat"
Screen capture from Lessons from Practice: Teaching with Copyright Chat

These modules are meant to be very flexible so that instructors can use them in their courses as they see fit. They are organized into three categories: Basics Lessons, Fair Use Lessons, and Rights Statements Lessons. Each module explains the lesson objectives and is centered on an episode of the ©hat (Copyright Chat) Podcast. Some modules incorporate recommended readings as well. Each module has some “homework” for students to do outside of class as well as in-class exercises and discussion topics. The lessons are organized into modules because an instructor may only wish to engage with a particular topic, such as fair use or copyright myths, or might be more ambitious and have time to devote to all eight lessons. In any event, each module can stand alone or be used with other modules to create a course unit. The CC-BY license attached to the modules sets the sky as the limit in terms of remixing, reusing, and revising modules and I hope instructors will make these lessons their own. I’m excited to see how these modules will help students learn more about copyright.

About the Author

Sara R. Benson is the copyright librarian and an assistant professor at the Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She also teaches courses at the iSchool at the University of Illinois. She holds a JD from the University of Houston Law Center, an LLM from Boalt Hall School of Law at Berkeley, and an MSLIS from the School of Information Science at the University of Illinois. Prior to joining the library, Sara was a lecturer at the University of Illinois College of Law for ten years. Sara is the host of the  ©hat (“Copyright Chat”) Podcast, available on iTunes.

New to the SCN: Copyright, Disability, and Accessibility

We’re excited to be developing the Scholarly Communication Notebook (SCN), a hub of open teaching and learning content on scholcomm topics that is both a complement to an open book-level introduction to scholarly communication librarianship (coming along) and a disciplinary and course community for inclusively sharing models and practices. We’re currently working with ISKME to establish the SCN as an OER Commons Hub, coming soon. With generous support from IMLS, we’re pleased to be able to financially support the development of model resources for the SCN. Last fall we issued a CFP (the first of three) for projects to support the initial population of the SCN, and we’re starting to see those projects come to fruition. Last week, we shared the first of a series of posts about those projects. Here, we’re excited to share the next one, by Associate Professor and the Head of Research & Instructional Services at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Carli Spina. Carli has created a rich set of resources to support instruction at the intersection of copyright, disability, and accessibility (currently in a Google folder while the SCN itself is in development). This is an important topic that’s seeing increased visibility, and that we’re proud to  support. Look for additional posts over the coming months, along with the second of three calls for proposals soon. Here’s Carli introducing her project:

Understanding how to make materials accessible to patrons is a vital topic for libraries, given that approximately 15% of the world’s population, or an estimated one billion people, is disabled. Beyond that, it is vital as we work to make access to information more equitable. While an important aspect of this work is understanding the technological aspect of making content accessible, I believe copyright is also central to this work. For that reason, it is important that librarians and others in the education field understand the copyright provisions in both U.S. and international law that apply to making copyrighted materials accessible for disabled individuals. With this knowledge, libraries can help to expand access to information to those who have been blocked from these resources in the past.

Because of this, I am grateful for Scholarly Communication Notebook’s support in creating open educational resources on the intersection of disability, accessibility, and copyright with a particular focus on U.S. law. I designed the materials to be used both in graduate courses related to copyright or accessibility and by practitioners interested in learning more on the topic. Topics covered include the Chafee Amendment and how it has changed post-Marrakesh Treaty, the role of accessibility in the Authors Guild, Inc. v. HathiTrust decision, the importance of the Marrakesh Treaty for international efforts to make materials accessible across borders, and how licensing provisions can impact these various rights. The resources include videos explaining the key points of each topic, along with editable slide decks for those who wish to build on the existing materials, activities and options for assignments, recommended pre-class readings, discussion prompts, and related resources for those who want to learn more on the topics introduced in this OER module. There are also teaching notes for those interested in using the module in a class they are teaching.

It is my hope that these materials will help to introduce these topics at the intersection of disability, accessibility, and copyright to interested learners in a variety of settings. I hope that they are of use and that interested instructors will be able to adapt and even expand these materials to fit their courses. And, I hope that they might even spark an interest in accessibility for those who do not have much familiarity with the topic.

About the Author

Carli Spina is an Associate Professor and the Head of Research & Instructional Services at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Formerly, Carli was the Head Librarian for Assessment & Outreach at the Boston College Libraries. She’s on Twitter at @CarliSpina.